Sonia Sotomayor Biography, Age, Family, Husband, Children, Diabetes and Net Worth

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Sonia Sotomayor Biography

Sonia Sotomayor is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. She was born on June 25, 1954, in The Bronx, New York City, to Puerto Rican parents. Sotomayor graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1976 and received her law degree from Yale Law School in 1979.

After law school, Sotomayor worked as an assistant district attorney in New York before joining a private law firm. She then served as a judge on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York from 1992 to 1998, and on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit from 1998 to 2009.

In 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Sotomayor to the Supreme Court, and she was confirmed by the Senate later that year. She is the first Hispanic and the third woman to serve on the Supreme Court.

Sotomayor is known for her commitment to issues of social justice and equality. She has written notable opinions on topics such as affirmative action, voting rights, and criminal justice reform. Sotomayor has also been a vocal advocate for diversity on the bench and in the legal profession.

Outside of her work on the Supreme Court, Sotomayor is an advocate for education and has written several children’s books. She has also been open about her struggles with diabetes and has worked to raise awareness about the disease.

The importance of education was greatly emphasized by Sotomayor; she purchased the Encyclopædia Britannica for her children, something rare in housing projects. Despite the rift between the two, which grew after the death of her father and was not completely reconciled until decades later, Sotomayor credited her mother with being her “life inspiration.

For grammar school, Sotomayor attended Soundview’s Blessed Sacrament School, where she was valedictorian and had a near-perfect attendance record. Sotomayor was on the forensics team under Cardinal Spellman and was elected to the student government. In 1972, she graduated as a valedictorian. In the meantime, the Bronxdale Houses had fallen prey to the Black Spades gang’s growing use of heroin, violence, and emergence.

Sonia Sotomayor Age

She is currently 68 years old today in 2023. Sotomayor was born on 25 June 1954 in The Bronx, New York, United States. She celebrates her birthday on 25 June every year.

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Sonia Sotomayor Family

She is the daughter of Celina Báez, an orphan from the neighborhood of Santa Rosa in Lajas, a rural area on Puerto Rico’s southwest coast and Juan Sotomayor, who was born in 1921 in Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico.  Sonia’s younger brother, Juan Sotomayor, who was born in 1957, later became a physician and university professor in the Syracuse, New York, area.

Her parents married during World War II after Celina served in the Women’s Army Corps. Celina Baez worked as a telephone operator and then a practical nurse. Sotomayor was raised a Catholic and grew up in the South Bronx and East Bronx of Puerto Rican communities; she felt closest to her grandmother, who she later said gave her a “protection and purpose” source. At age seven, Sonia was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and started to take regular insulin injections. At the age of 42, her father died from heart problems when she was nine years old.

Sonia Sotomayor High School

Sonia Sotomayor attended Cardinal Spellman High School, a Catholic high school located in The Bronx, New York. She graduated from the school in 1972.

While at Cardinal Spellman, Sotomayor was an active student who participated in a variety of extracurricular activities. She was a member of the school’s debate team and student council, and she also played the piano and sang in the choir.

Sotomayor has spoken fondly of her time at Cardinal Spellman and credits the school with helping to shape her values and work ethic. In her memoir, “My Beloved World,” she writes about how the school’s rigorous academic program challenged her and helped her to develop her critical thinking skills.

Sotomayor has also maintained a connection to Cardinal Spellman in her professional life. In 2014, she visited the school to speak with students and faculty about her experiences as a Supreme Court Justice and the importance of education.

Overall, while Sonia Sotomayor’s time at Cardinal Spellman High School was more than 50 years ago, she has maintained a strong connection to the school and credits it with helping to shape her values and work ethic.

Sonia Sotomayor Quotes

Sonia Sotomayor is a highly respected judge and legal scholar, and throughout her career, she has shared many insightful and inspiring quotes on a range of topics. Here are a few of her notable quotes:

”Until we reach equality in education, we can’t reach equality in the larger society.

”I have come to believe that in order to thrive, a child must have at least one adult in her life who shows her unconditional love, respect, and confidence.
”As members of the judiciary tasked with intervening to carry out the guarantee of equal protection, we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society.
In every position that I’ve been in, there have been naysayers who don’t believe I’m qualified or who don’t believe I can do the work. And I feel a special responsibility to prove them wrong.

”Through reading, I escaped the bad parts of my life in the South Bronx. And, through books, I got to travel the world and the universe. It, to me, was a passport out of my childhood and it remains a way – through the power of words – to change the world.

”Whether born from experience or inherent physiological or cultural differences…our gender and national origins may and will make a difference in our judging.
You know, failure hurts. Any kind of failure stings. If you live in the sting, you will – undoubtedly – fail. My way of getting past the sting is to say no, I’m just not going to let this get me down.
Pretending to be a princess is fun, but it is definitely not a career.

”I realized that people had an unreal image of me, that somehow I was a god on Mount Olympus. I decided that if I were going to make use of my role as a Supreme Court Justice, it would be to inspire people to realize that, first, I was just like them and second, if I could do it, so could they.

“I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life.” This quote, from a 2001 speech by Sotomayor, sparked controversy during her Supreme Court confirmation hearings. Sotomayor has explained that her point was that diversity of experience is valuable in decision-making, and that all judges bring their life experiences to the bench.

“The idea that a woman or a minority has to be better than everyone else is a fallacy.” Sotomayor has often spoken out about the challenges faced by women and people of color in the legal profession. This quote speaks to the idea that these groups should not have to work harder than their peers to achieve success.

“I don’t believe we should bend the Constitution under any circumstance. It says what it says. We should do honor to it.” Sotomayor is known for her commitment to the rule of law and her adherence to the Constitution. This quote emphasizes the importance of interpreting the Constitution as it is written, rather than trying to mold it to fit personal beliefs or agendas.

“Until we get equality in education, we won’t have an equal society.” Sotomayor has been a strong advocate for education throughout her career, and this quote highlights the crucial role that education plays in achieving equality and social justice.

“I am a product of affirmative action. I am the perfect affirmative action baby. I am Puerto Rican, born and raised in the South Bronx. My test scores were not comparable to my colleagues at Princeton and Yale. Not so far off so that I wasn’t able to succeed at those institutions.” This quote, from a 2001 speech, speaks to Sotomayor’s personal experience with affirmative action and her belief in its importance in creating opportunities for underrepresented groups.

Overall, Sonia Sotomayor’s quotes reflect her deep commitment to justice, equality, and the rule of law. Her words serve as a reminder of the importance of diversity, education, and fairness in our society.

Sonia Sotomayor Husband

Sonia Sotomayor is not currently married, and has never been married. However, she has been in a long-term relationship with Kevin Edward Noonan, a patent lawyer and professor of law at the University of Notre Dame from 1976-1983.

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Sotomayor and Noonan first met while they were both students at Yale Law School in the 1970s. They began dating in the 1980s and have been together ever since, although they maintain a largely private personal life.

In her memoir, “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor describes Noonan as one of her closest friends and a trusted advisor. She also writes about how their relationship has evolved over the years, from an initial period of intense attraction to a deep and enduring friendship.

Despite their close relationship, Sotomayor and Noonan have kept their personal life out of the public eye. They rarely appear together at public events, and Sotomayor has generally been reticent about discussing her personal relationships in interviews.

Overall, while Sotomayor is not currently married, her relationship with Noonan has been an important part of her life for many years. She has described him as a trusted friend and advisor and credits him with helping her to navigate the challenges of her legal career.

Sonia Sotomayor Children

Sonia Sotomayor does not have any biological children. However, she is an aunt and has spoken openly about the importance of her family in her life and work.

In her memoir, “My Beloved World,” Sotomayor writes about growing up in a close-knit family in The Bronx. She was particularly close to her mother, Celina, who worked hard to provide for her family and instilled in her a love of learning and a strong work ethic.

Sotomayor’s family has also been supportive of her legal career. In 2009, when Sotomayor was nominated to the Supreme Court, her mother was in attendance at the White House for the announcement. Sotomayor has also spoken about how her family’s experiences as Puerto Ricans in New York have influenced her perspectives on issues of diversity and social justice.

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Despite not having any biological children of her own, Sotomayor has been a strong advocate for children’s rights and education. She has written several children’s books, including “Turning Pages: My Life Story” and “Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You,” that promote empathy, understanding, and the importance of education.

Overall, while Sotomayor does not have any biological children, her family and her experiences growing up in The Bronx have played an important role in shaping her life and work. She has used her platform as a Supreme Court Justice to advocate for children’s rights and education and to promote empathy and understanding for people from diverse backgrounds.

Sonia Sotomayor Political Party

Sonia Sotomayor’s political party affiliation is not publicly known. However, as a Supreme Court Justice, Sotomayor is expected to maintain political impartiality and to make decisions based solely on the law and the Constitution, rather than political ideology or party affiliation.

It is common practice for Supreme Court nominees to avoid taking public positions on political issues and to refrain from discussing their party affiliation during confirmation hearings. This is because the Supreme Court is meant to be an impartial body that interprets the law without bias towards any particular political party or ideology.

Despite this, Sotomayor has been identified as having liberal leanings in some of her legal opinions and rulings. For example, she has expressed support for affirmative action and has been critical of some aspects of the criminal justice system, such as mandatory minimum sentences.

Overall, while Sotomayor’s political party affiliation is not public knowledge, her record as a Supreme Court Justice suggests that she may hold liberal views on some issues. However, as a member of the Court, she is expected to remain impartial and to make decisions based solely on the law and the Constitution, rather than partisan politics.

Sonia Sotomayor Facts

Here are some interesting facts about Sonia Sotomayor:

  1. Sotomayor was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1954 to Puerto Rican parents.
  2. She grew up in a public housing project in the Bronx and attended Catholic schools.
  3. Sotomayor was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 7 and has been an advocate for diabetes research and education.
  4. She graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1976 and earned her law degree from Yale Law School in 1979.
  5. Sotomayor was a prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office from 1979 to 1984, before entering private practice.
  6. In 1991, she was appointed to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H.W. Bush.
  7. In 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court, making her the first Hispanic Supreme Court Justice.
  8. Sotomayor is known for her outspoken and passionate opinions, particularly on issues related to race, gender, and social justice.
  9. She has written two memoirs: “My Beloved World” and “Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You.”
  10. Sotomayor is an avid fan of baseball and has thrown the first pitch at several major league games.

Overall, Sonia Sotomayor’s life and career are marked by a commitment to justice, education, and public service. She has overcome significant obstacles in her life, including a diagnosis of diabetes and a challenging upbringing in the Bronx, to become one of the most influential legal voices in the United States.

Sonia Sotomayor Education

By her own later account, Sotomayor joined Princeton University on a full scholarship, winning acceptance in part because of her high school accomplishments and in part because affirmative action made up for her standardized test scores not being entirely equal to those of other applicants. Sotomayor was awarded the Pyne Prize as a senior, the top award for undergraduates, reflecting both strong grades and extracurricular activities. In 1976, she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and graduated summa cum laude with an A.B. in history.

In the fall of 1976, Sotomayor joined Yale Law School, once again on a scholarship. While she believes she again benefited from affirmative action to compensate for somewhat lower standardized test scores, a former dean of admissions at Yale has said that given her record at Princeton, it probably had little effect. She fit in well at Yale, although she noticed there were a few Latino students again.

Sonia Sotomayor Ethnicity

Sonia Sotomayor’s ethnicity is Puerto Rican. She was born on June 25, 1954, in The Bronx, New York City, to parents who had moved to New York from Puerto Rico during World War II.

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Puerto Ricans are a group of people who are citizens of the United States but who are also considered part of the Latino or Hispanic community. The island of Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory located in the Caribbean, and its residents are U.S. citizens by birth. Puerto Ricans have a rich cultural heritage that blends Spanish, African, and Indigenous influences.

Sotomayor has spoken openly about her Puerto Rican heritage and how it has influenced her life and work. In her 2013 memoir, “My Beloved World,” she writes about growing up in a working-class family in the Bronx and feeling like an outsider because of her ethnicity and background. She also writes about how her experiences as a Puerto Rican woman have shaped her perspective on the law and on issues of diversity and social justice.

As the first Hispanic Supreme Court justice, Sotomayor has become an important role model and advocate for Latino representation in the legal profession. She has spoken out about the need for greater diversity on the bench and has worked to create opportunities for underrepresented groups in the legal field.

Overall, Sotomayor’s ethnicity as a Puerto Rican has been an important part of her identity and has shaped her perspective on the world. Her experiences have informed her work as a judge and advocate for social justice, and she has become an inspiration to many in the Latino community and beyond.

Sonia Sotomayor Net Worth

She has an estimated net worth of $6 million as of 2023. Her income is from her career as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Sonia Sotomayor, Diabetes

At the age of seven, Sonia was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and started taking regular injections of insulin. At the age of 42, her father died from heart problems when she was nine years old. She became fluent in English after this. Sotomayor said that she was first inspired by the strong-willed character of Nancy Drew ‘s book, and then, after her diabetes diagnosis led doctors to suggest a different detective career, by watching the Perry Mason television series, she was inspired to go into a legal career and become a judge.

Sonia Sotomayor Court of Appeals judge

On June 25, 1997, President Bill Clinton nominated Sotomayor for a seat in the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals, which was vacated by J. From Daniel Mahoney. Initially, her appointment was supposed to be smooth sailing, with a “well trained” professional evaluation provided to her by the American Bar Association Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary. Nevertheless, as described by the New York Times, “[it was] embroiled in the Senate’s sometimes tortured judicial politics.”

Some in the Republican majority believed that Clinton was eager to appoint the first Hispanic Supreme Court judge and that an easy confirmation to the appeals court would put Sotomayor in a better position for a possible nomination to the Supreme Court. Consequently, the Republican majority decided to slow down the confirmation process. Radio commentator Rush Limbaugh weighed in that Sotomayor was an ultraliberal who went to the highest court on a “rocket ship.”

Sonia Sotomayor Books

Sonia Sotomayor is not only a highly respected judge and legal scholar, but also a published author. She has written several books, both memoirs and children’s books, that offer insights into her personal life and her perspectives on the law. Here are a few of her notable works:

“My Beloved World” – This memoir, published in 2013, chronicles Sotomayor’s life from childhood to her appointment to the Supreme Court. The book offers a candid look at her upbringing in The Bronx, her struggles with diabetes, and her experiences as a Puerto Rican woman in a largely white, male-dominated legal field.

“Turning Pages: My Life Story” – This children’s book, published in 2018, tells the story of Sotomayor’s life through the lens of her love of books and reading. The book features illustrations by Lulu Delacre and highlights the importance of education and reading for young people.

“Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You” – This children’s book, published in 2019, promotes empathy and understanding for people with disabilities. The book features a diverse cast of characters, each with a different disability or difference, and encourages children to ask questions and learn about others’ experiences.

“The Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor” – This adaptation of Sotomayor’s memoir for young readers was published in 2018. The book features simplified language and illustrations and is designed to introduce young people to Sotomayor’s life story and her values of perseverance, hard work, and empathy.

Sotomayor’s books offer a glimpse into her personal life and her perspectives on issues of social justice, diversity, and education. Her children’s books, in particular, promote values of empathy and understanding and encourage young readers to learn about and appreciate differences. Overall, Sotomayor’s books reflect her commitment to education and her belief in the power of storytelling to create understanding and positive change.